Jack Warner questions why U.S. Soccer absolved in Garcia report

Former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner has told The Times that the Garcia report into corruption around the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bids is “not even worth the paper it has been written on” and questioned why U.S.

Garcia in 2014 but only released in full this week, said the England 2018 World Cup bid team was found to have “accommodated or at least attempted to satisfy the improper request” of executive committee members, including Warner, ahead of the voting in 2010.

The United States’ effort to host the 2022 World Cup, meanwhile, was found to have generally followed FIFA’s bidding rules.

Warner, who was arrested and charged as part of the FBI’s probe into money-laundering in 2015 and then banned from taking part in any football-related activity for life, told the English newspaper in an email that he continues to “sleep very soundly” following the report’s release.

Other favours granted to Warner were the waiving of a 168,000 debt owed to the Football Association by the Jamaican Football Federation and the sponsorship of a 36,000 Caribbean Football Union gala dinner.

Confirmation of the SFO’s interest comes 20 months after its director, David Green, told MPs of potential money-laundering offences, including a payment of 500,000 Australian dollars ( 295,000) made by the Australia 2022 bid committee to former CONCACAF president Warner, which may have gone through London.